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OET Exam Coaching

Course available for 100 days
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Duration: 60 hours
Lectures: 107

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Best OET Coaching Centre in Kerala
 

B-GHUD provides you with the best OET online/offline coaching in Kerala, India. The OET is an ideal qualification for healthcare workers who hope to register and practice in the English-speaking world, and we offer  best OET coaching online and offline.

Unlike other tests, OET is designed specifically for the international health and social care industry and reflects real professional working scenarios, such as consulting with a patient or writing a referral letter. Our OET preparation course provides intensive training in medical English for workers including doctors, nurses, dentists, dietitians, pharmacists, occupational therapists, vets and other health and social care professionals. 

Already recognized by authorities in Australia, Dubai, New Zealand and Singapore, the OET is now accepted in the UK by the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) and the General Medical Council (GMC) as proof of English proficiency for registration purposes.

Why and Who should attend OET Exam Coaching?

This online course is for students who are looking to attain their highest possible OET grade.  You will be placed in an online class with people of a similar language level as you. The course is perfect for those who need expert language tuition wherever they are in the world. Ideal for:

  • Doctors/Consultants
  • Nurses
  • Dentists
  • Dietitians
  • Optometrists
  • Pharmacists
  • Physiotherapists
  • Podiatrists
  • Occupational Therapists

OET

1
A CHALLENGING EXERCISE ON GRAMMAR
2
AN EXERCISE ON ARTICLES PART-1
3
AN EXERCISE ON ARTICLES PART-2
4
AN-EXERCISE-ON-COMMA-PART-4
5
AN EXERCISE ON COMMA PART-5
6
AN EXERCISE ON SYNTAX
7
AN EXERCISE ON THE CONSISTENCY OF TENSE
8
ANTONYMS TO ENHANCE YOUR VOCABULARY
9
APPOSITIVES & ADJECTIVE CLAUSES
10
BE FAMILIAR WITH THESE BASIC WORDS
11
BE GOOD AT ENGLISH EXERCISE-4
12
BE METICULOUS ON THE AGREEMENT
13
BE THOROUGH WITH GRAMMAR
14
BE WELL-VERSED WITH PERPOSITIONS
15
BEAUTIFUL SENTENCES
16
CLEFT SENTENCES
17
COMFORABALE WITH THESE IMPRESSIVE SENTENCES
18
CONDITIONAL SENTENCES
19
EMBARRASSING GRAMMAR MISTAKES
20
ENHANCE YOUR VOCABULARY PART-2
21
ESSENTAIL VOCABULARY
22
HOMOPHONES
23
HOW TO WRITE case notes accurately
24
IMPRESSIVE STRUCTURES
25
LEARN THE BASICS OF ENGLISH PART-2
26
LEARN THE STRUCTURE OF THESE QUESTIONS
27
LEARN THE SUBTLE ASPECTS OF ENGLISH
28
MORE EXAMPLES OF COMPLEX SENTENCES
29
PARELLEL STRUCTURE
30
PARTS OF SPEECH IN DETAIL
31
PREPOSITIONS
32
RARE AND EXPRESSIVE STRUCTURES
33
RULES ON WRITING NUMBERS
34
TOPICS OF ROLE PLAYS
35
YOU CAN EASILY AVOID COMMON MISTAKES
36
“Has had,”
37
A FEW IMPORTANT WORDS
38
A GOOD COMMAND OF GRAMMAR
39
ACTIVE AND PASSIVE VOICES
40
AN EXERCISE ON COMMA PART-1
41
AN EXERCISE ON COMMA -PART-2
42
AN EXERCISE ON COMMA PART-3
43
AN EXERCISE ON HOMONYMS
44
AN EXERCISE ON PRESENT PERFECT TENSE
45
APT USE OF APOSTROPHES
46
Are you GOO D at Grammar
47
ARE YOU GOOD AT ASKING QUESTIONS
48
BASIC RULES OF ENGLISH
49
BE COMFORTABLE WITH NATURAL PHRASES
50
BE FAMILIAR WITH THESE EXPRESSIONS
51
BE GOOD AT ENGLISH – ALL TENSES -PART-1
52
BE GOOD AT ENGLISH ALL TENSES PART-2
53
BE GOOD AT ENGLISH ALL TENSES PART-3
54
BE GOOD AT ENGLISH BY USING EXERCISE -1
55
BE GOOD AT ENGLISH EXERCISE -2
56
BE GOOD AT ENGLISH EXERCISE -3
57
BE GOOD AT SPELLING
58
CHOOSE THE CORRECT SENTENCES
59
COMMON ERRORS PART-1
60
COMMON MIASTAKES PART -2
61
COMMON MISTAKES PART -1
62
COMMONLY MISSPELT WORDS
63
COMPLEX AND COMPOUND SENTENCES
64
COMPLEX SENTENCES
65
COMPOUND WORDS WITHOUT HYPHEN
66
CORRECT THESE AND GET A GOOD SCORE
67
CORRECTING COMMON MISTAKES EXERCISE-1
68
CORRECTING COMMON MISTAKES EXERCISE-2
69
CORRECTIONS MAKE YOU PROFICIENT
70
EASY MISTAKES YOU CAN AVOID PART-1
71
EASY MISTAKES YOU CAN AVOID PART-2
72
EASY MISTAKES YOU CAN AVOID PART -3
73
EASY PHRASES TO EXPRESS WELL
74
EASY WAY TO HAVE CLARITY ON GRAMMAR
75
ENHANCE YOUR VOCABULARY-PART-1
76
ERRORS FREQUENTLY
77
EXERCISE ON VOCABULARY PRACTICE
78
EXERCISES ON SYNTAX
79
GRAMMAR EXERCISE –TENSES
80
GRAMMAR TIPS FOR OET WRITING
81
HOW TO MAKE OET WRITING
82
IRREGULAR VERBS
83
LEARN AFFIRMATIVE SENTENCES
84
LEARN THE BASICS OF ENGLISH-PART-1
85
LEARNING SYNTAX IS FUN!
86
LITTLE, A LITTLE, THE LITTLE
87
MORE COMMON ERRORS PART-2
88
PARTS OF SPEECH
89
PHRASAL VERBS
90
PRESENT PERFECT TENSE
91
PRESENT PERFECT TENSE
92
PRONUNCIATION ATTRACTS 20% MARKS
93
PRONUNCIATION DOES MATTER
94
PUNCTUATIONS
95
RULES ON THE USE OF COMMA
96
SELF ANALYZE YOUR LEVEL OF ENGLISH EXERCISE-1
97
SENTENCE CORRECTIONS PART -1
98
SENTENCE CORRECTIONS PART-2
99
SENTENCE CORRECTIONS PART-3
100
SENTENCE CORRECTIONS PART-4
101
SENTENCE CORRECTIONS PART -5
102
SEVERAL USES OF ‘WOULD’
103
STATE VERBS
104
STUDY THE SPELLING OF THESE WORDS
105
THE PRESENT PERFECT TENSE
106
WHEN TO ADD ‘S’ WITH VERBS
107
WORDS & MEANINGS
The Listening sub-test is designed to assess a range of listening skills, such as identifying specific information, detail, gist, opinion or the speaker’s purpose. These skills are assessed through note-completion tasks and multiple-choice questions. Assessors who mark the Listening sub-test are qualified and highly trained. Candidate responses are assessed against an established marking guide. During the marking session, problematic or unforeseen answers are referred to a sub-group of senior assessors for guidance and all papers are double-marked to ensure fairness and consistency.
Your answers for Part A are double-marked by trained OET assessors. These answers are randomly assigned to assessors to avoid any conflict of interest. Your answers for Part B and Part C are computer scanned and automatically scored. For Part A, Listening assessors use a detailed marking guide which sets out which answers receive marks. Assessors use this guide to decide whether you have provided enough correct information to be given the mark. Assessors are monitored for accuracy and consistency.
Your answers for Part A are double-marked by trained OET assessors. These answers are randomly assigned to assessors to avoid any conflict of interest. Your answers for Part B and Part C are computer scanned and automatically scored. For Part A, Listening assessors use a detailed marking guide which sets out which answers receive marks. Assessors use this guide to decide whether you have provided enough correct information to be given the mark. Assessors are monitored for accuracy and consistency.
There are a total of 42 marks available in the Listening sub-test. Part A accounts for 24 marks, Part B accounts for 6 marks, and Part C accounts for 12 marks.
Across all three parts, a range of accents are used to reflect the global nature of the healthcare workforce. The main accents are: Australian, British, American, and other varieties such as New Zealand, Irish, Canadian, South Africa, etc.
For Part A, you must write your answers in the space provided in the question booklet. For Part B and Part C, you must shade the lozenge next to the appropriate answer. Answers written elsewhere in your booklet will not be marked. It is a good idea to use the sample tests to familiarise yourself with the different task formats you will find in the test.
Yes, you will have two minutes at the end of the sub-test to check your answers for all three parts of the sub-test. You will listen to each part of the test once only, so you must write your answers in the question booklet as you listen.
In Part A (the consultation), you must complete the notes using the same words you hear on the recording. You should not paraphrase the information and you should not change the information.
You can use abbreviations that are commonly accepted in your profession and which are clear to other professionals, for example “BP” for blood pressure. However, you should avoid abbreviations that are specific to a particular workplace or specialism, because these might not be commonly understood. OET assessors are trained to accept a reasonable range of abbreviations, but OET does not refer to any specific dictionaries or lists.
In Part A, you must complete the notes using the same word or short phrase that you hear in the recording. You will lose marks if you repeat the words from the notes, add information that is not in the recording, or if you contradict yourself or make your meaning unclear.
In the Listening sub-test, you will not be penalised for misspelling, provided the meaning is clear to other healthcare professionals. Any reasonable attempt at spelling the correct answer has a good chance of being accepted. Names for conditions and medications are often difficult to spell, and we try to ensure that candidates are not disadvantaged by this. Where possible, reference is made in the audio recording to both the generic and brand names for medications, and to both medical and lay terms discussed during the consultations. The marking guide gives assessors extensive guidance on the range of misspellings which are to be accepted. Please note that the Listening sub-test is different from the Reading and Writing sub-tests in the way misspellings are treated.
New listening tests are written for each test session incorporating new material and the grade boundaries are adjusted slightly for each test to allow for minor differences in the difficulty of items included in that particular version. The number of marks needed to secure grade B will therefore vary. However, test-takers awarded grade B (a scale score of 350) will typically have a score of at least 30 marks.
Listening – 50 minutes The Listening sub-test consists of three parts, and a total of 42 question items. The topics are of generic healthcare interest and accessible to candidates across all professions. The total length of the Listening audio is about 40 minutes, including recorded speech and pauses to allow you time to write your answers. You will hear each recording once and are expected to write your answers while listening. The Listening sub-test structure Part A – consultation extracts (about 5 minutes each) Part A assesses your ability to identify specific information during a consultation. You will listen to two recorded health professional-patient consultations and you will complete the health professional’s notes using the information you hear. Note: the health professionals may be any one of the 12 professions who can take OET. Part B – short workplace extracts (about 1 minute each) Part B assesses your ability to identify the detail, gist, opinion or purpose of short extracts from the healthcare workplace. You will listen to six recorded extracts (e.g. team briefings, handovers, or health professional-patient dialogues) and you will answer one multiple-choice question for each extract. Part C – presentation extracts (about 5 minutes each) Part C assesses your ability to follow a recorded presentation or interview on a range of accessible healthcare topics. You will listen to two different extracts and you will answer six multiple-choice questions for each extract.

Update from British Council | News

— 19 February 2021

  1. All British universities and colleges accept IELTS academic results.
  2. British Council to train nurses.